Tips and tricks

Food is key to general health and wellbeing – it’s true when they say “you are what you eat”. When you’re busy with your studies, social life or work, cooking up a fresh and nutritious meal can seem like a chore, but there are many ways to make it easy!

 

  1. Mindful shopping

Buying food as you go from the local shop is convenient, but your bank account will soon feel the strain. Often, you’ll pop to the shop while you’re hungry and come out with a quick fix, like a microwave meal. Make shopping for food an activity you set time aside to do, and buy in bulk – large bags of potatoes, rice or pasta will last a lot longer than you think. If you live with other people, it’s worth making a shopping trip together and sharing the cost of a taxi home with the goods, or paying towards petrol – this way you can get larger quantities at once and save a bit more.

 

  1. Meal prep

Get in the habit of cooking in bulk – If you know you have a few hours spare between studying, prep your meals for the next few days. At BRICTT you’ll be very active each day, so it’s important to get enough protein, carbs and healthy fats to keep your body fuelled for the day. An easy way to prep is to plan your weekly meals ahead, cook in bulk, such as chicken and veg, and use cheap food containers to store each meal in – that way you can easily grab them out of the fridge when you need to rush!

 

  1. Go beyond your greens

A good general rule for eating fruit and veg is that the more varied in colour your fruit and veg are, the wider the spectrum of nutrients you’re consuming! There are many local fruit stalls around Brighton (especially around London Road, right around the corner from BRICTT). These stalls are often a lot cheaper than the supermarket, and it’s always great to help a local business too!

 

  1. Exercise

Although you’ll be very active here at BRICTT, an essential factor in your wellbeing is regular exercise. If going to the gym isn’t your thing – a short walk in the fresh air can make all the difference to energy levels, mental wellbeing and general physical health.

 

  1. Downtime

It’s important to get enough sleep and allow yourself some time away from screens and bright lights to relax before bed. If you’re waking up tired, try experimenting with your bedtime routine to find habits that work for you – you could be dehydrated! Drink a glass of water when you wake up to help set you up for the day ahead. Good hydration is essential to keeping yourself energised.

 

While a healthy diet, good sleep habits and regular exercise should all contribute to better wellbeing, there are times when that doesn’t seem to be enough. Never be afraid to ask for help or advice if you feel like you need it – whether from a tutor, a friend, your doctor or somebody else you trust. Here’s some useful links:

https://mind.org.uk/

http://www.nhs.uk/livewell/mentalhealth/Pages/Mentalhealthhome.aspx

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  • Brighton, Student Support